Contaminants of Emerging Concern Are Subject of LGA’s 134th Meeting

The Lake George Association is bringing in experts from around New York State to discuss with members and guests the results of a yearlong water sampling research project for “Contaminants of Emerging Concern.” LGA staff were trained in spring 2018 in order to participate in this research project. The public is cordially invited to the event.

The 134th Annual Meeting of the Lake George Association is Friday, Aug. 16, at the Lake George Club.

MaryGail Perkins
Teng Zeng

MaryGail Perkins, of the Upstate Freshwater Institute, and Teng Zeng, an Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University, will discuss the research project and the data derived from the samples collected by the LGA during the summer of 2018. The research project was funded through a grant from the National Science Foundation, and was integrated into the New York Citizen Statewide Lake Assessment Program protocols.

Professor Zeng is the Principal Investigator of the project.

The research project integrates citizen science and research into contaminants of emerging concern, and allowed the scientists to amass needed data on the occurrence of these contaminants in New York lakes.

The project offers a first public look in Lake George for such substances.

Stephanie June

Stephanie June, a NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Research Scientist, will explain the Citizen Statewide Lake Assessment Program and how the LGA’s work and the samples we collected fit into the research project. June is the current coordinator of the CSLAP program.

Contaminants of emerging concern refer to organic contaminants that:

  • Are not routinely monitored or regulated
  • Originate from both diffuse and point sources
  • Occur at low to very low concentrations in aquatic systems
  • Have the potential to cause adverse (and unrecognized) ecosystem effects

The contaminants fall into four broad categories: pharmaceuticals; pesticides; household chemicals; and algal toxins.

Scott Kishbaugh

At the 134th annual meeting, the LGA will also be honoring Scott Kishbaugh with the Lake George Association Special Citation, for his decades of work on behalf of Lake George and many other Lakes in New York State.

Kishbaugh recently retired as chief of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Lake Monitoring and Assessment Section. He directed the NY Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program, including training more than a dozen LGA volunteers, from 1985 until turning the program over to Stephanie June in 2018. LGA Executive Director Walt Lender and Education Director Kristen Wilde will present the citation to him.

In addition, the LGA staff will update members on completed water quality protection projects and success of previous years, as well as updates on the EPA award-winning Floating Classroom program, the reach of our educational and outreach programs, and results from our citizen science investigations.

At the meeting, members will discuss LGA business as well as vote on directors to the LGA’s Board. Members should visit this page or call the LGA office at 518-668-3558 to reserve their seat.

After the meeting, attendees are invited to join us for a delicious lunch at the Lake George Club for a cost of $33 per person. (There is no donation to the LGA included in this price.)

The Lake George Club is located at 4000 Lake Shore Drive, Diamond Point. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. and the program starts at 10 a.m.

The Lake George Association is the oldest and most experienced lake protection organization in the country, whose members support water quality protection, scientific monitoring, education and lake-friendly living programs that benefit the watershed from Lake George Village to Ticonderoga.

All the money raised by the Lake George Association goes to projects and programs that benefit the Lake and the watershed, protecting Lake George water quality now and in the future.

You Can Make A Difference In Lake George Water Quality Right Outside Your Door! Contribute Now

All the money raised by the Lake George Association stays in the Lake George watershed and is used to protect Lake George from Ticonderoga to Lake George Village.
Lake George Association

Lake George Association